Does Smoking Cigarettes Make Cold Sores Worse?

We all know that cigarettes and the use of tobacco products can lead to some awful health problems. The topic of nicotine and cold sores, unfortunately, hasn’t specifically undergone the same level of medical research. We have our suspicions, but do we really know the answer?

If you are a smoker, you will likely concede that very few things can stop you from having a cigarette. However, a painful red blister followed by an ugly yellow scab is likely to do just that. This is especially true for those who feel self-conscious and are concerned about what other think.

Does the use of tobacco make cold sores worse? Does quitting smoking trigger cold sores? These are just some of the questions that will be answered. Subjects concerning the use of smokeless tobacco and alternative smoking methods, such as vaping, will also be discussed.

While choosing to smoke is a personal choice, it is important to know about the pitfalls. Although the most obvious health risks have been well-documented and discussed for decades, others have not. Cold sores and cigarettes would certainly fall under this umbrella.

Does Smoking Worsen Cold Sores?

Smoking does have the potential to make cold sores worse or increase the number of outbreaks. Will smoking affect your cold sores? Unfortunately, there is no definitive proof. Like so many things in life, this is a case-by-case situation.

Smoking is not healthy. This much is not in debate. However, as it relates to cold sores you almost have to look beyond the broad spectrum. To understand nicotine and cold sores, you must first understand HSV-1.

Cigarettes weaken your immune system. While the deterioration is not stark and perhaps something you are unable to notice, tobacco compromises your immunity. This is critical to know because one of the primary triggers of cold sores is a weakened immune system.

If you have a red blister, smoking can worsen your cold sore. Although some will certainly fare better than others, cigarettes can be problematic. The level of impact will likely depend on how often you smoke. If you are a regular smoker, you can expect more problems.

Based on both logic as well as medical findings, education is key. Below are a few points you need to know about smoking and cold sores.

  • Smoking cigarettes can weaken your immune system over time.
  • Cold sores thrive (are triggered) by compromised immune health. The less your body can fight the more susceptible you become to HSV-1.
  • Smoking can cause the healing time of a cold sore to be prolonged. Nicotine can also result in additional outbreaks.
  • Everyone is different. How often do you smoke? Your answer will likely determine how long it takes for your cold sore to heal.

What Causes Cold Sores to Flare Up?

Before you can understand what can prompt a cold sore flare up you must first understand HSV-1. Education about this virus is paramount. The more you know, the easier to becomes to heal and treat cold sores.

As it relates to the topic of smoking, nicotine can play a negative factor. This is especially true as it relates to triggers. Because HSV-1 often resides in a dormant state, certain actions can activate it.

What causes cold sore to break out? Listed below are some of the main triggers of a cold sore.

  • While quite an uphill battle for some, keeping stress under control is important.
  • Weather conditions. Too much sun and too much cold can set off an outbreak.
  • Existing illness. Do you currently have an illness? Even something as basic as the common cold? The simple act of your body having to fight off another virus can awaken HSV-1.
  • Poor immune health. Because nicotine can weaken your immune health, cigarettes can be problematic.
  • If you smoke, your blood circulation will deteriorate. This could cause cracks and openings to appear on the lips, opening you up to viral infection or reinfection. A similar thing happens when you spend too much time in the sun.

Should I Smoke with a Cold Sore?

Have you smoked with a cold sore in the past? Did the sore get worse? Was the healing time halted or made worse? If you have had an experience, you can use it to make a more informed decision.

Can smoking make a cold sore worse? Potentially, yes.

If you do decide to smoke with a cold sore, you should logically expect the worst. Additional sores, poor healing, more treatment measures, etc.

Here are some important things to consider.

  • You are in charge. The best you can ever do is educate yourself. However, the final decision to smoke will always be yours.
  • How much do you value your appearance? If you have an existing cold sore is smoking worth the risk? These are certainly questions worth asking to yourself. Logic suggests that no one would willingly welcome a series of unattractive lip blisters and a period of recovery.
  • Are you addicted to nicotine or do you simply have an oral fixation? The latter can be quelled with chewing gum and much safer alternatives. Removing cigarettes from your daily routine can also allow you to treat your sores more effectively. Various creams and patches have been reviewed on this site. That information can help you make an informed decision.

Here’s some further help and advice on quitting tobacco:

http://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/ss/slideshow-13-best-quit-smoking-tips-ever

How Does Smokeless Tobacco Affect Cold Sores?

Although searching for an alternative to cigarettes is wise, not every alternative is safe. As it relates to tobacco and cold sores, smokeless tobacco can also be problematic.

While smokeless tobacco allows you to get a nicotine rush without risk of lung cancer, cold sores present a different type of problem. Due to the placement of chewing tobacco or snuff (dip) the lip region can be compromised.

If you place tobacco directly below the infected area, problems can arise. Not only will the lip stretch to accommodate the plug of tobacco but the cold sore can be manipulated. If your goal is to treat and heal the cold sore, placing tobacco just inches away is not wise.

Here are a few educational points and considerations.

  • The placement of smokeless tobacco can be an issue. The bulging of the skin below can stretch the lip. This can cause the sore to be manipulated and burst.
  • You have to spit if you dip. Do you want tobacco juices to come in contact with a cold sore? To each their own, but this will obviously create an unwanted issue.
  • If you wear a cold sore patch or active cream, moist and loose tobacco can compromise healing.

What Are the Effects of E-Cigarettes & Vaping?

Since we have already covered the potential risks of cigarette smoking and cold sores, where does vaping enter the fold? Can e-cigarettes worsen a cold sore?

While the long-term effects of vaping remain somewhat of a mystery, most vaping liquids do contain nicotine. Not all, but most.

On the surface the only real advantage vaping will provide is the absence of smoke. Exhaled by vapors, the cloud dissipates fast. The smell of the product depends on the e-liquid used.

Although vaping is tobacco-free, framing it as a safe alternative would be a stretch. As it relates to the primary topic at hand, the practice of vaping is potentially problematic.

  • Toxins weaken the immune system. While vaping could be deemed as a safety measure to kick tobacco use, that does not apply to cold sores.

Man smoking a cigarette with cold sores

Could Quitting Smoking Trigger Cold Sores?

While you can potentially get cold sores from smoking, you can also get cold sores because you quit cigarettes. Although that notion likely seems asinine on the surface, in theory, it is reasonable.

How does this happen?

Stress is a known trigger for cold sores. The act of quitting cigarettes can cause your body extreme anxiety. If you are anxious to smoke again, this can create tension within the body. This fact alone can cause an outbreak.

  • Withdrawal can trigger anxiety.
  • Are you addicted to nicotine? If you have been smoking for years, the stress (trigger) is only made worse.
  • Sudden pause or going “cold turkey” can make you sick. If you have become depended on nicotine, your body will suffer in the short-term. As mentioned earlier, general illness can activate HSV-1.

Smoking & the Frequency of Cold Sores

Although facts point to a potentially negative outcome from using tobacco products, everyone is affected differently. The only way that you’re going to find out for sure is through personal experience. Pay close attention to the way that your body responds and act accordingly.

As long as you are educated on the subject and have cold sore treatments that work quickly stored in your medicine cabinet, you’ll be able to minimize the number of outbreaks and heal faster. Is smoking a good option if you are prone to cold sores? That’s a decision that only you can make.